Talking MAD on NPR


Click above to listen to the interview on NPR on “AirTalk with Larry Mantle” from today, Monday July 8 2019.
I was interviewed along with Tom Richmond, Marty Dundics, Kit Lively and a slew of other artists, writers and call-ins.
Southern California Public Radio  (NPR Los Angeles)



The End of an Era

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The contributors of MAD received an email yesterday detailing the plan for the 67 year-old iconic MAD Magazine’s wind-down. After issue #10 (the numbers were set to 0 after the reboot in California) the magazine will no longer publish any new content from contributors. It will run old content with new covers, publish collections and special collections only.

I can’t say it was a big surprise, but it’s a devastating blow in a year that has already seen a morbid downturn in opportunities for cartoonists.

I’m still gathering my thoughts on this, so stay tuned. Dropping the news the day before July 4th seems like a very deliberate move on DC Entertainment’s part in a hope to bury the story.

I sincerely hope that is not the case.

Shop Talk: On Trying to Please the Crowd with Your Art

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One big lesson I learned as an artist in the past year is this:


Create for yourself. The people who like it will find you. Those who don’t will fall away. But, you’ll be left with a loyal core of people who like what you’re doing. 

Don’t curate your art to what gets likes. Curate it to what you like.

The National Cartoonists Society Responds to New York Times Decision to Cease Running Daily Editorial Cartoons

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June 12th, 2019

Re: Response to Editorial Page Editor, James Bennet’s statement: June 10th, 2019.

On behalf of the membership of the National Cartoonists Society, the NCS Board of Directors express our great dismay at the decision announced to cease running daily editorial cartoons in all international editions of the New York Times as of July 1st, 2019 as they have already done for the domestic edition.

Editorial cartooning is an invaluable form of pointed critique in American newspapers that dates back to the 19th-century work of the legendary Thomas Nast, as well as to pamphlet images published by Benjamin Franklin. The history of our great nation can be read through the pens of our editorial artists and cartoonists. Journals of record are the conduits to this history.

The cartoonists that contribute to your publication are not mere hobbyists, but deeply committed life-long devotees to the art of political commentary. It is not a job that is taken lightly, nor done with ease. It is a passion that not only feeds the national and international conversation, but just as importantly, feeds their families.

The contribution of cartoonists to your publication are as important and viable as those of op-ed contributors, and yet you would never consider dropping the op-eds.

We find ourselves in a critical time in history when political insight is needed more than ever, yet we see more and more cartoonists vanishing from the pages of our publications. If we are to dull the voices of our most valued critics, satirists, and artists, we stand to lose much more than the ability to debate and converse; We lose our ability to grow as a society. We rob future generations of their opportunity to learn from our mistakes.

We would implore the management of the New York Times to reconsider their decision, and reinstate daily editorial cartoons to both the domestic and international editions of The New York Times in print and online.

Sincerely,

Jason Chatfield,

President
National Cartoonist Society
prez@reuben.org

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A Chatfield/Hunt Full-pager in MAD #8, flying off your local newsstand now!

A Chatfield/Hunt Full-pager in MAD #8, flying off your local newsstand now!

Keep a less-than-keen eye out in the next issue of MAD magazine for a jolly old cartoon by yours truly and the very funny Ian Hunt.

Ian and I met doing stand-up in New York and he’s been writing for MAD for just over a year now. It was a lot of fun collaborating with him and the team at MAD on this crazy one-pager.

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Episode #45: Live from NCSFest with Bob Mankoff

Please forgive the sound quality!

Today's episode features special guest, New Yorker Cartoon Editor emeritus, Current Cartoon & Humor Editor of Esquire Magazine and Creator of the Cartoon Collections, Bob Mankoff.

Thank you for your support and to those who came out to the show, recorded live on stage at NCSFest 2019 in Huntington Beach, California.

Stay tuned to the YouTube channel for the video version of this episode.

Ginger Meggs: Introducing... Rahul Jayasinha!

Ginger Meggs: Introducing... Rahul Jayasinha!

Today marks the first appearance one of three new characters being introduced to the Ginger Meggs universe in 2019: A young Australian boy named Rahul Jayasinha.

Rahul’s father was born in India, met his wife in Sri Lanka and moved to Australia to start their own medical practice. Now both Australian citizens, they had Rahul ten years after moving to Australia, making him a dinki di Aussie! He’s just moved house and so has just started at Ginger’s school.

Rahul loves nothing more than getting out in the sun and playing cricket — and giving Ginger a run for his money! He’s a little bit taller than the other boys, and can run faster than Tiger Kelly on a rampage.

The first appearance of Rahul occurs at the end of today’s Sunday strip, the second of a three-part continuation after Ginger is forced to stay in his bedroom and finish his homework before he’s allowed to go and play cricket with the boys.

Unfortunately, he arrives too late and the game is all wrapped up. He discovers they had invited the new kid to fill-in, but fast realised that he was so good, they wouldn’t mind having him on the team permanently!

Rahul will develop with the rest of the characters in the strip over time, and we’re excited to see him work his way into more storylines across the coming years. Every Aussie kid should be able to see themselves in the characters of Ginger Meggs. Stay tuned for our next introduction this year of a young indigenous Australian girl who plays music and gives the lads a run for their money on the sports field!

And of course, stay tuned for more adventures with the entire gang, every day at GoComics.com

  • A big note of thanks to my friend Dilruk Jayasinha for his advice on the character and his cultural heritage.

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